Track Your Teams with Gameday Experience Apps

Thursday, August 17 at 02:00 PM
Category: Arvest News

Arvest is excited to be the presenting sponsor of a collection of mobile apps that let you keep track of your favorite sports teams, no matter where you are!Football Fan
 
Developed by From Now On, an Omaha, Neb.-based emerging player in mobile app technology, the apps are branded for many of the universities, colleges and high schools within our footprint and are provided at no cost to the fans! The gameday experience apps are designed to enhance your fan experience and promote engagement.

Each school’s app—based off the FanX platform—features team info, event schedules, live stats, scores, stadium maps, personalized notifications and much more.

“Providing the FanX app to these institutions is an innovative way to elevate fan engagement while also fulfilling our mission of giving back to our communities,” said Jason Kincy, SVP and director of marketing for Arvest Bank.

You can download the apps via the App Store* and Google Play* or you can search for your school’s name in the search bar.

Go teams!

Here is a list of the gameday experience apps within our footprint. This list is current as of Aug. 10, 2017.

  • MSSU Lions GO (Missouri Southern Athletics)
  • Gorilla Experience (Pittsburg State Athletics)
  • UMKC Roos Athletics (University of Missouri-Kansas City Athletics)
  • Arkansas Tech Experience (Arkansas Tech University Athletics)
  • UAFS Lions Gameday (University of Arkansas-Fort Smith Athletics)
  • University of Ozarks Athletics
  • ORU Golden Eagles Live (Oral Roberts University Athletics)
  • NSU Live (Northeastern State University Athletics)
  • Oklahoma Christian Athletics
  • Cameron Aggies Gameday (Cameron University Athletics)
  • Little Rock Gameday Experience (University of Arkansas-Little Rock)


Coming soon! This list is current as of Aug. 10, 2017:

  • Drury University
  • Bartlesville High School
  • West Plains High School
  • Mountain Home High School
  • Yellville Summit High School


Links marked with * go to a third-party site not operated or endorsed by Arvest Bank, an FDIC-insured institution.

Tags: College, Online Services, Technology
 

Make the Grade on Back-to-School Shopping

Tuesday, July 18 at 11:00 AM
Category: Personal Finance

As kids prepare to return to class, it’s the parents who are gearing up for the shopping assignment.

Back-to-school shopping is one of the most significant shopping events all year, second only to the winter holiday season, according to the National Retail Federation.* Last year, total back-to-school spending was estimated to top $75 billion nationwide.

During the weeks leading up to the first day of school, parents generally spend hundreds of dollars per child* on clothing, accessories, school supplies, electronics and more. It’s no wonder that the winding down of summer can be a stressful time for many families. 

That’s why we’ve compiled a list of three easy tips to help you ace the school shopping assignment with confidence and perhaps a little less stress.

  1. Make a list and set a budget
    This step is paramount to your back-to-school shopping success. Gather your child’s school list of needed supplies and take an inventory of any leftover school supplies* that your child may be able to use again this year. Compile lists of clothing items, electronics and equipment that your child will need for the year. It’s also important to think beyond supplies, electronics and clothing—consider upcoming school activities or clubs your child may want to join and the costs associated. Examples could include field trips, basketball uniforms, a musical instrument, or fees for Spanish club. This will help you get the full picture and plan out your budget accordingly. 

    BONUS POINTS: Planning for back to school is a perfect opportunity to talk to your kids about money. Having your children develop and stick to a budget for back to school expenses can help instill good financial habits. Arvest’s Education Center also has a number of online calculators and links to useful articles to help families budget and save for the school year. 
     
  2. Plan ahead and find deals
    Be on the lookout for bargains, especially for big-ticket items that are on your list, like computers and graphing calculators. Experts note that deals on pencils and notebooks are easier to find. Consider following your favorite retailers on social media or subscribing to store e-newsletters to be among the first to learn of flash sales, special discounts and promotions announced via those channels. If you prefer to do your back-to-school shopping online, look for special “online only” deals and free shipping from many of the major national retailers. 

    Also, be sure to take advantage of tax free shopping days, where applicable. Shopping on those days will help you get the biggest bang for your buck on clothing and other qualifying items, even some online retailers participate. Many of the communities Arvest serves are located in states that have tax free holiday shopping days. Additional details are available at the links below.
  3. Spend wisely
    When it’s time to tackle your list, it’s easy to get caught up in the moment, but you should try to resist the urge to splurge, experts warn. Stick to your list and budget and you’ll be glad you did. It’s also a good idea to discuss how your family will pay for the purchases before hitting the store or buying online. Will you be paying with a debit card or charging the purchases on a credit card? If the latter, be sure to factor in the costs and advantages you may have by using the card, including rewards points.
Now that you’ve finished your back-to-school shopping homework, you can make the experience a positive one for you and your family! 

Links marked with * go to a third-party site not operated or endorsed by Arvest Bank, an FDIC-insured institution.
 
Tags: Budgeting, Cash Management, College, Financial Education, Savings
 

Don’t Let a College Savings Plan Crack Your Retirement Nest Egg

Wednesday, January 18 at 09:15 AM
Category: Personal Finance

Balancing saving for retirement and saving for your child's college can be tricky. Here are some tips to help you manage both at the same time.

LOWELL, Ark.  Two of the largest savings plans consumers need to fund and manage in their lifetime are saving for their child’s college and for their personal retirement. These are plans that take time to adequately build, but one doesn’t have to negate the other. Both can be managed successfully and simultaneously through early planning.

“Above all, start saving for both as soon as possible,” said Donny Rogers, President of Arvest Bank Trust. “From the moment you get your first job to the moment you learn you’re going to be a parent, set aside money and let it grow.”

Rogers says the balancing act begins with determining how much of the college expense parents want to fund and what other big-ticket expenses they may also cover for their children. 

“It’s smart to focus on saving for college, but the reality is that there are a few other large expenses that require long-term budgeting,” Rogers said. “If you plan on buying your teenager their first car or paying for a daughter’s wedding, you need to factor those expenses into your budget so you segment your savings plans across the board. I always tell parents that it’s fair to require some ‘sweat equity’ from their kids so they contribute to the expense of paying for a car or shouldering a portion of any student loans. There’s no expectation that parents pay 100 percent of all of those expenses.”

A 529 Plan offers a tax-free savings option for college that is specifically earmarked for post-secondary education. These state-specific plans have different rules of engagement but typically can be used to fund expenses from tuition to housing to other necessary items for school. Significant supplemental funding is also available in the form of academic, athletic and arts scholarships.  

While you can borrow for college expenses, you can’t do the same for retirement savings. Therefore, it’s critical to begin saving early for your retirement nest egg and to budget in parallel with other savings priorities. Maximizing an employer’s 401(k) matching option puts “free money” in your account. In the event you need to adjust your savings more heavily toward college, be sure not to reduce your retirement savings below the level of employer matching. It’s recommended that 10 percent of your income be allocated toward retirement every year.

“Regardless of how well you plan, there will inevitably be change and the need for adjustments along the way, and that’s perfectly normal,” Rogers said. “Consistency will reward your efforts when you need to utilize those funds.”

The so-called “catch-up plan” that allows individuals age 50 and over to make extra contributions can help consumers make up for lost ground during the saving process, once college and major expenses have been paid for, but Rogers advises customers not to lean too heavily on that option. He says the number of variables involved in retirement planning can sometimes cause consumers to miss significant savings. Those may include the length of time one plans to work, or is able to work; the kind of lifestyle one wants to lead after retirement; the security of their career and other potential factors or risks.

In addition, the rate of inflation and the rising cost of college tuition will affect how much of an impact savings for college and retirement have on the larger family budget, making that early foundation and steady savings plan even more important in the long run.

Tags: College, Financial Education, Press Release, Retirement, Savings
 

Gable Sloan Bakes for Charity - People Helping People Series

Monday, January 16 at 04:10 PM
Category: People Helping People
Gable Sloan, now a sixth grader, found her passion for baking when she was 7 years old. She realized her passion could turn into something bigger – a business selling her baked goods. While most kids might spend their money, Gable wanted to do more with her earnings. She started donating her money to different charities. Gable has awarded one scholarship and plans to award another scholarship to a graduating high school senior this year. By the time she’s 18, Gable hopes to raise $100,000 for different charities and scholarship funds! Watch Gable in action.

Gable’s story is part of Arvest Bank’s People Helping People series featuring citizens giving back to their community. 

Keep an eye on our social media channels for both videos and written stories highlighting the good works of dedicated citizens in the communities Arvest Bank serves.  

Links marked with * go to a third-party site not operated or endorsed by Arvest Bank, an FDIC-insured institution.  

Tags: Arkansas, Charitable Giving, College, Community Support, Fayetteville, People Helping People
 

6 Financial Traps New College Graduates Should Avoid

Wednesday, July 13 at 10:25 AM
Category: Personal Finance

As recent college graduates start their careers, their financial lifestyle should be top of mind, says the American Bankers Association. ABA has highlighted six traps new college graduates should avoid to fortify their finances as they transition from the dorm to the office.

“Now is the time for college grads to get their financial life started on the right foot,” said Corey Carlisle, executive director of the ABA Foundation. “When it comes to managing your finances in the real world, pulling an all-nighter isn’t the best strategy. Forming positive financial habits today will set you up for lifelong success.”

According to ABA, new college graduates should avoid the following financial traps:
 
  • Not having a budget. Don’t spend more than you make. Calculate the amount of money you’re taking home after taxes, then figure out how much money you can afford to spend each month while contributing to your savings. Be sure to factor in recurring expenses such as student loans, monthly rent, utilities, groceries, transportation expenses and car loans.  
  • Forgoing an emergency fund. Make it a priority to set aside the equivalent of three to six months’ worth of living expenses. Start putting some money away immediately, no matter how small the amount. A bank savings account is a smart place to stash your cash for a rainy day. Use your tax refund for this instead of an impulse buy.
  • Paying bills late – or not at all. Each missed payment can hurt your credit history for up to seven years, and can affect your ability to get loans, the interest rates you pay and your ability to get a job or rent an apartment. Consider setting up automatic payments for regular expenses like student loans, car payments and phone bills.
  • Racking up debt. Understand the responsibilities and benefits of credit. Shop around for a card that best suits your needs, and spend only what you can afford to pay back. Credit is a great tool, but only if you use it responsibly. 
  • Not thinking about the future. It may seem odd since you’re just beginning your career, but now is the best time to start planning for your retirement. Contribute to your employer’s 401(k) or similar account, especially if there is a company match. Invest enough to qualify for your company’s full match – it’s free money that adds up to a significant chunk of change over the years.  
  • Ignoring help from your bank. Most banks offer online, mobile and text banking tools to manage your account night and day. Use these tools to check balances, pay bills, deposit checks, monitor transaction history and track budgets. 
For more tips and resources on a variety of personal finance topics such as mortgages, credit cards, protecting your identity and saving for college, visit aba.com/Consumers.*
 
The American Bankers Association is the voice of the nation’s $16 trillion banking industry, which is composed of small, regional and large banks that together employ more than 2 million people, safeguard $12 trillion in deposits and extend more than $8 trillion in loans.
 
Links marked with * go to a third-party site not operated or endorsed by Arvest Bank, an FDIC-insured institution. 

Tags: Budgeting, College, Debt, Financial Education, Retirement, Savings

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